Daniel Tebbi DMD Cosmetic Dentistry and Orthodontics

(818) 789-2034

Traditional Braces & Clear Braces

Traditional braces have been around for many years. They are the standard among patients looking to straighten their smile. Today's contemporary braces are made of exceptionally strong metals as they need to be able to stand the test of time while they are on your teeth. While contemporary braces are metallic colored, there are a number of bands and features that can be utilized to spruce them up.

Whether you're an adult or a teen, we all want to look our best at all times. Changing the way your teeth are structured takes time and there are now ways to keep you looking your best during this period. Clear braces or ceramic braces are translucent. This new technology is available for most cases. The great benefit of these braces is that you won't have to have that metallic look. In addition, clear braces are specifically designed so that they won't stain or wear over time.

Early Treatment:

It's best to see children by age 7 to advise if orthodontic treatment is required and it is the best time for that patient to be treated. The first permanent molars and incisors have usually come in by that time and crossbites, crowding, and other problems can be evaluated.

When orthodontic treatment is begun early, it can guide the growth of the jaw and guide incoming permanent teeth. Early treatment can also regulate the width of the upper and lower dental arches, gain space for permanent teeth, avoid the need for permanent tooth extractions, reduce likelihood of impacted permanent teeth, correct thumb-sucking, and eliminate abnormal swallowing or speech problems. In other words, early treatment can simplify the treatment process.

Adult Treatment:

Orthodontic treatment can be successful to improving your overall health and the aesthetics of your smile at any age.

When considering orthodontic treatment as an adult, the idea of having braces makes some people shy away from taking care of dental health and aesthetic issues. The fact is that one of every five patients in orthodontic treatment is over age 21, and the numbers of adult patients is growing exponentially.

With more and more adults turning to orthodontic care to improve their smiles, orthodontic professionals are recognizing more and more that the aesthetic benefits to orthodontics are not limited to the smile.

Common Problems

Class II

Class II problems represent an abnormal bite relationship in which the upper jaw and teeth are located in front of the lower jaw and teeth. Class II patients usually exhibit a convex facial profile with a recessed chin. A skeletal Class II problem occurs when the upper back molars are forward of the lower back molars. This gives the patient the appearance of having a recessed lower jaw, a protruding upper jaw or both. In both cases, this relationship is due to the inherited characteristics.

Class III

Class III problems are also primarily genetic in origin. In this instance, the lower jaw and teeth are positioned in front of the upper jaw and teeth. The lower jaw may appear to be excessively large, but in many cases the lack of upper jaw development is at fault. Several treatment options are available to correct a Class III problem.

Crowding

Crowding of the teeth is probably the most common orthodontic problem. Although many factors contribute to dental crowding, this problem typically stems from a discrepancy between the space in each jaw and the size of the teeth.

Crowding is often one of several orthodontic problems. Crowding can be the cause or result of other problems, such as impacted teeth, retained teeth or teeth that do not naturally fall out. Crossbite of the front or rear teeth can also cause the teeth to become crowded.

Deepbite

Excessive vertical overlapping of incisor teeth, called "overbite", is generally found in association with excessive eruption of either the upper or lower incisors or sometimes both.

Spacing

Spaces between teeth are another common problem associated with the need for orthodontic care. Like crowding, spacing may be related to a tooth-to-jaw size disharmony. Spacing may occur between the front and the back teeth. Tooth size discrepancies, such as smaller teeth or abnormally shaped teeth, can also create abnormal spacing.

Openbite

An openbite can occur with both the front or back teeth. An openbite on the front teeth is called an anterior openbite, while an openbite on the back teeth is called a posterior openbite. An anterior openbite is the lack of vertical overlap of the front teeth and can usually be traced to jaw disharmony or habits such as thumb sucking or the posture of the tongue pushing against the front teeth. A posterior openbite is a problem in which the back teeth do not meet vertically, which keeps the jaw from functioning properly.

Excessive Gingival Display

Also known as a gummy smile, this orthodontic problem gives the appearance of excessive exposed gums on the upper arch. There are several treatment options for this problem. In severe cases, corrective jaw surgery may be necessary to actually shift the jaw vertically upward, thus reducing the amount of exposure of the upper gum tissue.

Crossbite

A posterior crossbite will usually result from a narrow upper jaw or abnormally wide lower jaw. When a patient with a narrow upper jaw is closing their mouth, they will likely be forced to move the lower jaw forward or to the side in order to achieve a stable bite. When closed into this accommodating position, the lower teeth are located outside the upper teeth.

A posterior crossbite can involve one side of the jaw, known as a unilateral crossbite, or both sides of the jaw, known as a bilateral crossbite.

Pseudo Class III

Pseudo Class III, particularly in younger patients, is often a function of habit rather than hereditary factors. A misaligned bite may cause the lower front teeth and jaw to deflect forward of the upper front teeth, giving the appearance of a Class III relationship.

Common Problems

Class II

Class II problems represent an abnormal bite relationship in which the upper jaw and teeth are located in front of the lower jaw and teeth. Class II patients usually exhibit a convex facial profile with a recessed chin. A skeletal Class II problem occurs when the upper back molars are forward of the lower back molars. This gives the patient the appearance of having a recessed lower jaw, a protruding upper jaw or both. In both cases, this relationship is due to the inherited characteristics.

Class III

Class III problems are also primarily genetic in origin. In this instance, the lower jaw and teeth are positioned in front of the upper jaw and teeth. The lower jaw may appear to be excessively large, but in many cases the lack of upper jaw development is at fault. Several treatment options are available to correct a Class III problem.

Crowding

Crowding of the teeth is probably the most common orthodontic problem. Although many factors contribute to dental crowding, this problem typically stems from a discrepancy between the space in each jaw and the size of the teeth.

Crowding is often one of several orthodontic problems. Crowding can be the cause or result of other problems, such as impacted teeth, retained teeth or teeth that do not naturally fall out. Crossbite of the front or rear teeth can also cause the teeth to become crowded.

Deepbite

Excessive vertical overlapping of incisor teeth, called "overbite", is generally found in association with excessive eruption of either the upper or lower incisors or sometimes both.

Spacing

Spaces between teeth are another common problem associated with the need for orthodontic care. Like crowding, spacing may be related to a tooth-to-jaw size disharmony. Spacing may occur between the front and the back teeth. Tooth size discrepancies, such as smaller teeth or abnormally shaped teeth, can also create abnormal spacing.

Openbite

An openbite can occur with both the front or back teeth. An openbite on the front teeth is called an anterior openbite, while an openbite on the back teeth is called a posterior openbite. An anterior openbite is the lack of vertical overlap of the front teeth and can usually be traced to jaw disharmony or habits such as thumb sucking or the posture of the tongue pushing against the front teeth. A posterior openbite is a problem in which the back teeth do not meet vertically, which keeps the jaw from functioning properly.

Excessive Gingival Display

Also known as a gummy smile, this orthodontic problem gives the appearance of excessive exposed gums on the upper arch. There are several treatment options for this problem. In severe cases, corrective jaw surgery may be necessary to actually shift the jaw vertically upward, thus reducing the amount of exposure of the upper gum tissue.

Crossbite

A posterior crossbite will usually result from a narrow upper jaw or abnormally wide lower jaw. When a patient with a narrow upper jaw is closing their mouth, they will likely be forced to move the lower jaw forward or to the side in order to achieve a stable bite. When closed into this accommodating position, the lower teeth are located outside the upper teeth.

A posterior crossbite can involve one side of the jaw, known as a unilateral crossbite, or both sides of the jaw, known as a bilateral crossbite.

Pseudo Class III

Pseudo Class III, particularly in younger patients, is often a function of habit rather than hereditary factors. A misaligned bite may cause the lower front teeth and jaw to deflect forward of the upper front teeth, giving the appearance of a Class III relationship.

Give us a call today so we can discuss in more detail about getting you that perfect smile! and to see if you're a candidate for ceramic braces!

   
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