Daniel Tebbi DMD Cosmetic Dentistry and Orthodontics

(818) 789-2034

Central Sleep Apnea

Central sleep apnea is a less common type of sleep apnea. This disorder occurs if the area of your brain that controls your breathing doesn't send the correct signals to your breathing muscles. As a result, you'll make no effort to breathe for brief periods.

Central sleep apnea can affect anyone. However, it's more common in people who have certain medical conditions or use certain medicines.

Central sleep apnea can occur with obstructive sleep apnea or alone. Snoring typically doesn't happen with central sleep apnea.

Conditions that may be associated with central sleep apnea include the following:

  • Congestive heart failure
  • Hypothyroid Disease
  • Kidney failure
  • Neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease)
  • Damage to the brainstem caused by encephalitis, stroke, injury, or other factors

Central sleep apnea Treatment

Treating the condition that is causing central sleep apnea can help manage symptoms. For example, if central sleep apnea is due to heart failure, the goal is to treat the heart failure itself.

Devices used during sleep to aid breathing may be recommended. These include nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) or adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV). Some types of central sleep apnea are treated with medicines that stimulate breathing.

Oxygen treatment may help ensure the lungs get enough oxygen while sleeping.

If narcotic medicine is causing the apnea, the dosage may need to be lowered or the medicine changed.

Quick, easy and painless ways to assess your risk for a sleep disorder. Complete this short questionnaires on this link . If you would like you can forward your completed form(s) to us for a professional evaluation.

To assess your risk for Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), click here

Designed using DDS WebStudio by DentalXChange.com